from “Bleary/Jagged” from “Bleary/Jagged” from “Bleary/Jagged”
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 
Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)
3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester
project description:
In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 

Sculptural calendar (group of three sculptures)

3D Studio:  Body In Time - Spring Semester

project description:

In charting the time period from being accepted to Parsons through the end of the school year, I chose to create a group of three sculptures that each represent a specific time within that time period.  The first sculpture is a plaster cast of my hand and camera, which is representative of the earliest time within the calendar:  the time when I was devoted to fine art photography.  Eventually I became very frustrated with photography and realized that I no longer wanted to pursue it, which was the inspiration behind the second sculpture:  a three-dimensional collage constructed from shards of my photography, representing a frustration with photography and a transition to new media.  The third piece is an abstraction of a question mark created using aluminum and wire.  In its standard position, the piece could be viewed as a question mark, but when pictured inverted, the sculpture could be perceived as an exclamation point, representing that I look forward to my future at Parsons, while exactly what the future holds is unknown. 

General Slocum Memorial
created with Abby Tobin
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester
The General Slocum Disaster was considered the largest tragedy in New York City until September 11th.  On June 15th, 1904, 1,342 people boarded the steamboat for their annual church picnic.  The ship began to sail up the East River toward Long Island, and suddenly a fire erupted, resulting in the deaths of 1,021 passengers, many of whom were women and children.  This work was created as a memorial to the victims of the tragic event.  Cut-paper figures rest peacefully on a wooden abstraction of the ship.  The victims’ names and ages appear around the perimeter of the piece. General Slocum Memorial
created with Abby Tobin
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester
The General Slocum Disaster was considered the largest tragedy in New York City until September 11th.  On June 15th, 1904, 1,342 people boarded the steamboat for their annual church picnic.  The ship began to sail up the East River toward Long Island, and suddenly a fire erupted, resulting in the deaths of 1,021 passengers, many of whom were women and children.  This work was created as a memorial to the victims of the tragic event.  Cut-paper figures rest peacefully on a wooden abstraction of the ship.  The victims’ names and ages appear around the perimeter of the piece. General Slocum Memorial
created with Abby Tobin
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester
The General Slocum Disaster was considered the largest tragedy in New York City until September 11th.  On June 15th, 1904, 1,342 people boarded the steamboat for their annual church picnic.  The ship began to sail up the East River toward Long Island, and suddenly a fire erupted, resulting in the deaths of 1,021 passengers, many of whom were women and children.  This work was created as a memorial to the victims of the tragic event.  Cut-paper figures rest peacefully on a wooden abstraction of the ship.  The victims’ names and ages appear around the perimeter of the piece. General Slocum Memorial
created with Abby Tobin
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester
The General Slocum Disaster was considered the largest tragedy in New York City until September 11th.  On June 15th, 1904, 1,342 people boarded the steamboat for their annual church picnic.  The ship began to sail up the East River toward Long Island, and suddenly a fire erupted, resulting in the deaths of 1,021 passengers, many of whom were women and children.  This work was created as a memorial to the victims of the tragic event.  Cut-paper figures rest peacefully on a wooden abstraction of the ship.  The victims’ names and ages appear around the perimeter of the piece.

General Slocum Memorial

created with Abby Tobin

Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester

The General Slocum Disaster was considered the largest tragedy in New York City until September 11th.  On June 15th, 1904, 1,342 people boarded the steamboat for their annual church picnic.  The ship began to sail up the East River toward Long Island, and suddenly a fire erupted, resulting in the deaths of 1,021 passengers, many of whom were women and children.  This work was created as a memorial to the victims of the tragic event.  Cut-paper figures rest peacefully on a wooden abstraction of the ship.  The victims’ names and ages appear around the perimeter of the piece.

replica of my glasses in copper and clay
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester replica of my glasses in copper and clay
Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester

replica of my glasses in copper and clay

Lab:  City Cultures - Spring Semester